What happens to you after you die is a question with no answer. What happens to your stuff, however, is much more clear. If you own property and assets, you should strongly consider drafting a will. That way you, and not your state government, can decide who gets your property and assets when you die. In most cases, wills are written legal documents, but some states do recognize other types of wills. The legal requirements of each state can vary, so it’s essential that your will is drafted and executed properly. The main reason for having a will is to allocate your property to heirs in any way you like. But there are other things you can include such as funeral arrangements, legal guardians for your minor children, and who should serve as executor of your will or trustee of any trusts you create.

 

  • A Will Must Meet Certain Legal Requirements

Most wills are formal documents that instruct how money and property should be distributed to each person named as an heir. Typically, for a will to be valid, you need to have one or two people witness you signing the will and then sign it themselves. The witnesses can be anybody,; they require no special qualifications. In some states, however, wills that are handwritten or simply spoken can be legally enforceable, too.

 

  • A Will Keeps The Government Out Of It

When you die without a will, state laws known as “intestate succession laws” will decide which family members will inherit your estate and in what proportion. In most states, your spouse and children take priority under intestate succession. If you want other people to inherit some of your property, or if you want to leave everything to your spouse and children, but in different proportions than they would receive under your state’s law, a will is one of the best ways to ensure that the state won’t make that decision for you.

 

  • Make It Easier On Your Family

The division of an estate after death can bring out many emotions. The slightest differences can result in hurt feeling and recriminations. As divorce becomes more complex and blended families more common, dividing assets has become even more complicated. A typical situation is when you’re in a second marriage and have children from your first marriage. In this case, allocating your property purposefully between your second spouse and your children can give you peace of mind and prevent your family from fighting over your possessions.

 

  • DIY Solutions May Cause More Problems Than Solutions

The law surrounding creation of a will is complicated and nuanced. Plus, the facts of each case are unique. This article provides a brief, general introduction to the topic. For more detailed, specific information, please contact a trusts and estates lawyer.

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